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  TASTE News Service October 29, 2013 - Fall is a beautiful time of year and marks the harvest of many crops, hops being among them. Fresh hoped beers are trendy now, but Deschutes Brewery of Bend, Oregon has been producing beers of this style for nearly a decade. Taste California Travel recently tried a couple of Deschutes' offerings. Fall of 2013 marks the ninth appearance of their Hop Trip. Our informal tasting panel thought is smelled heaver than it tasted. While not showing the most robust aspects of wet (fresh) hopping, it was a solid performer and reminded one…
by Dan Clarke Sometimes we discourage publicists from sending products we just don't think sound very interesting. However, in the case of the two interpretations of seasonal beer that arrived recently, we were intrigued. Two accomplished brewers collaborated on the project not to produce one beer, but to come at the pumpkin-theme from different perspectives: Shaun Sullivan, the brewmaster at San Francisco's 21st Amendment Brewery and his friend Dick Cantwell of Elysian Brewing in Seattle. Both beers are available in cans labeled “HE SAID,” but sporting different colors and stories of the beers inside them. Each of these beers contains…
  Oakhurst, CA – September 26, 2013 – The Southgate Brewing Company in Oakhurst is holding a release party to help show off a new beer that helps mark the 150th Anniversary of the signing of the Yosemite Grant. The 1864 Ale, produced by brewmaster Rick Bouke, is an Oktoberfest style beer that will be available throughout the fall. Bouke said he used the past as an influence while creating this new brew. “I am excited to brew this beer for such a special occasion as the 150th anniversary of President Lincoln signing the Yosemite Grant. I tried to make…
by Jim Laughren   Documents released to the press earlier this week, purportedly written by the unofficial biographer of King Ludwig I of Bavaria, paint a fascinating picture of court life in early and mid-nineteenth century Germany, as well as providing insight into the origins of Oktoberfest. Heinrich Peeinhosen, spokesperson for Das Mumbler, the well known German language investigative journal, says the bundle of writings, attributed to Johann Wolfgang von de Amóre, Ludwig’s Austro-Italian confidant, personal advisor and unofficial biographer, were found beneath a false bottom in a wooden trunk apparently abandoned some fifty years ago in a fifth-floor garret…
by Dan Clarke RICHMOND, CA JULY 3, 2013--Operating a small business can be a tenuous proposition. Have you ever heard about a business closing and wondered, “What happened? I thought they were doing well.”Nathan Trivers gives it both thumbs up at his popular Up & Under pub in Point Richmond. Owners of the Up & Under Pub and Grill in the San Francisco Bay Area community of Point Richmond say their continued existence is uncertain. BottleRock, a music festival held in Napa May 9-12, has been having trouble paying its bills, according to the media. Nikki Villa and Nathan Trivers,…
from Tour de France Life France and wine are forever intertwined. But a year before the grand departure of the 101st Tour de France in Great Britain, one stage city has already debuted its homage to the event and its fondness for beer. With Yorkshire getting ready to host the departure of the 2014 Tour de France, East Yorkshire’s Great Newsome Brewery is preparing for the “world’s biggest sporting event.” It’s produced a cycling-inspired ale, Maillot Jaune (Yellow Jersey in French). The brew was launched to coincide with the recent Heart Of The Wolds Cycle group ride. But Great Newsome’s…
 by Dan Clarke Magazines—even internet magazines—get a lot of stuff sent to them. Often it's product for review. We purchase much of the wine and beer that we write about on our own money. Sometimes, though, bottles arrive unsolicited in a big brown van. We do not refuse them. Nor do we ask their senders to include any cash to help defray our editorial costs. Sometimes the deliveries contain efforts that are really inferior. In these cases, we may call 'em as we see 'em, or just say nothing about them. Opening these shipments—often several times a week—brings a Christmas…
From left, Lindsay and Casey Hawkins, owners of Southgate Brewing Company and brewmaster Rick Boucke, toast the success of their new Oakhurst brewpub. Beer lovers have a new place to try just outside of Yosemite National Park. Southgate Brewing Company opened their doors in Oakhurst—about 15 minutes south of Yosemite--just prior to the start of the Memorial Day Holiday weekend and so far, the public has loved the new microbrewery and restaurant. Owner Casey Hawkins said it’s his staff’s attention to service and detail that has helped them gain a quick following. “We have a knowledgeable, dynamic team that delivers…
With a casual, relaxed atmosphere and locals who take good beer seriously without taking themselves too seriously, San Diego is the perfect place to escape for a libation vacation. Industry innovators like Karl Strauss and Stone Brewing make their homes in San Diego, and the region boasts an enviable number of award-winning breweries and a wide variety of pubs and restaurants catering to those who enjoy unique, locally crafted beers. The following are some of the outstanding places where visitors can discover for themselves why beer lovers are flocking to the region's burgeoning craft brew scene. The Great American Beer…
by Dan Clarke The sign out front reads “100 beers.” I've never made it an issue to demand a count. To me it doesn't matter as The Shack easily has the best selection of beers in town. It also has the most knowledgeable clientele. It's an unpretentious establishment, but not as down-market as the name might imply. Under an earlier ownership, it was known as “the Sub Shack,” so the current identity is an evolution. Friends who attended nearby Kit Carson Junior High in the 1950's remember hanging out at this same spot, though their drinks were likely root beers.…
by Dan Clarke   What a waste. A loss to humanity, one of us said as we sat at the bar watching all that foam going down the drain. Of course, it's the nature of things that Guinness Stout must be poured slowly. It throws that wonderful, creamy head and must settle down a bit before the bartender tops it off with a second shot from the tap. Invariably some of the foam is lost as it's swept off the top to accelerate this process. But the foam is still beer, however oxygenated. And it seemed a shame to waste…
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